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Other Infections

10. Not Enough Syringe Programs for People Who Inject Drugs

The opioid epidemic in the U.S. -- with its attendant risk of overdose and HIV and viral hepatitis transmission -- remained a concern in 2016, with new data showing that many people who inject drugs do not have consistent access to sterile syringes.

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27 Million People in U.S. Use Illicit Drugs, Harm Reduction Not Keeping Pace

Nearly 21 million people in the United States struggle with substance use disorders, according to a new report, Facing Addiction in America: Surgeon General's Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health, released this week. Another new report by Harm Reduction International finds that harm reduction services are not adequate in the U.S. or worldwide, though the U.S. has seen some recent improvements.

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Sexually Transmitted Disease Rates Hit New Highs, CDC Report Says

Cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis are at their highest level ever -- exceeding last year's record levels -- even as STD prevention, testing, and treatment services have eroded, according to the latest Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance report, released this week by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Young people and gay and bisexual men are particularly heavily impacted, and transmission of syphilis from pregnant women to their babies is a growing concern.

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AASLD 2016: When You Eat May Contribute to Fatty Liver Disease as Much as What You Eat

People who skip breakfast and eat late at night may have an elevated risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), according to research presented at the AASLD Liver Meeting this week in Boston. This suggests that meal timing and frequency of meals may be modifiable risk factors for fatty liver disease, which can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer.

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STD 2016: Syphilis Rates Are Rising Among Gay Men, CDC Data Show

New state-level data reveal that syphilis cases continue to rise among gay and bisexual men, with men in the south having the highest rates, according to a presentation at the 2016 STD Prevention Conference last week in Atlanta. A related study found that half of gay and bisexual men in 20 cities were screened for syphilis during the past year, with 11% testing positive.

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Young Adolescents Need Only 2 Doses of Human Papillomavirus Vaccine, CDC Says

Adolescents age 11-14 years can receive 2 doses of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to prevent cancers caused by HPV, rather than the 3 doses previously recommended, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This change is supported by a systematic review presented at the recent IDWeek meeting in New Orleans, which found that 2 vaccine doses were non-inferior to 3 doses for this age group.

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STD 2016: Growing Threat of Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea in the U.S. and Worldwide

Public health officials in Hawaii have identified the first cluster of gonorrhea cases with reduced susceptibility to both drugs in the current recommended regimen, according to a report at the 2016 STD Prevention Conference taking place this week in Atlanta. While all 7 patients were successfully treated, this cluster underscores the need for new therapies, one of which was presented at the conference.

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IDWeek 2016: Rapid Emergence of Drug-Resistant Gonorrhea Seen in Ohio

Routine surveillance in southern Ohio has detected a steep increase in gonorrhea showing resistance to ciprofloxacin or reduced susceptibility to azithromycin, according to a presentation at IDWeek last week in New Orleans. Azithromycin is one of the 2 drugs in the sole recommended gonorrhea treatment regimen in the U.S., but no resistance to ceftriaxone, the other drug in that regimen, was seen.

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United Nations Assembly Addresses Growing Threat of Antibiotic Resistance

The United Nations General Assembly this week held a high-level meeting on antimicrobial resistance and passed a declaration calling on countries to do more to prevent, diagnose, and treat antibiotic-resistant infections. But participants stopped short of setting specific targets to reduce inappropriate antibiotic use or committing resources to address the growing problem.

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