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AIDS 2014: Novel Techniques Probed in HIV Cure Research

A pair of presentations at the 20th International AIDS Conference in Melbourne described new pathways being explored in the search for either a permanent cure for HIV or for longer-acting drugs. In one study, 2 artificial genes that cause cells to generate antiviral entry inhibitors produced significant inhibition of cellular infection. In the other, a technique that is the exact opposite of the much-explored "kick and kill" strategy (which uses drugs to activate cells latently infected with HIV) used an artificial gene fragment to maintain latently infected cells in a locked-down state that resisted strong immune stimulation.

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AIDS 2014: Disappointing HIV Cure News Leads to New Questions

The fourth IAS Towards an HIV Cure symposium -- an initiative of the International AIDS Society -- took place July 19-20, prior to the 20th International AIDS Conference in Melbourne.

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AIDS 2014: Researchers Discuss Progress Towards an HIV Cure [VIDEO]

Progress along the multi-pronged path towards a cure for HIV was one of the themes at the 20th International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2014), taking place this week in Melbourne. Researchers provided updates on the "Mississippi Baby," a novel assay for detecting low levels of hidden virus in the body, and using the anti-cancer drug romidepsin to reactivate latent virus.

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Coverage of the 2014 International AIDS Conference

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 20th International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2014), July 20-25, in Melbourne, Australia.

Conference highlights include biomedical HIV prevention (PrEP and treatment-as-prevention), HIV cure research, interferon-free therapy for hepatitis C and HIV/HCV coinfection, access to treatment, and fighting stigma and criminalization of key affected populations.

Full listing by topic

7/25/14

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AIDS 2014: Romidepsin Activates Latent HIV, But Does Not Decrease Viral Reservoir

The HDAC inhibitor romidepsin was able to awaken latent HIV in resting T-cells, causing it to start producing new virus, but this was not associated with a decrease in the size of the viral reservoir in T-cells, researchers reported at the 20th International AIDS Conference this week in Melbourne. This finding suggests that kicking HIV out of hiding will not be adequate for a functional cure without strengthening immune response against the virus.

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