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CROI 2015: Hepatitis C -- Mission Accomplished? [VIDEO]

New interferon-free treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) has brought about a revolution in treatment, but challenges still remain -- among them too few people with HCV being diagnosed and the high cost of the new drugs -- before the mission can be declared a success. A panel of hepatitis C experts discuss research presented at the recent 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections(CROI) in Seattle with HIVandHepatitis.com editor Liz Highleyman in this IFARA video.

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Atazanavir Associated with Less HIV Treatment Failure, Illness, and Death

People with HIV who used antiretroviral regimens containing the ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor atazanavir (Reyataz) had better outcomes than those taking lopinavir/ritonavir (Kaletra), including lower likelihood of AIDS-defining illnesses or death, less virological failure, and larger CD4 T-cell increases, according to a study published in the January 6 edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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6. HIV Drugs: Few New Approvals, but Pipeline Looks Promising

HIV drug development news in 2014 included approval of a new single-tablet regimen and 2 more components of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Promising candidates in the pipeline include a better-tolerated version of tenofovir, a NNRTI with fewer neuropsychiatric side effects, and potential long-acting injectables that may be useful for treatment or pre-exposure prophylaxis.

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FDA Approves 2 New Boosted Protease Inhibitor Coformulations for HIV

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) this week approved 2 new fixed-dose coformulations of HIV protease inhibitors with a cobicistat booster. Bristol-Myers Squibb's Evotaz contains atazanavir (sold separately as Reyataz) plus cobicistat, while Janssen Therapeutics' Prezcobix contains darunavir (sold separately as Prezista) plus cobicistat.

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HIV Drug Therapy: Lower-dose Efavirenz Equally Effective with Fewer Side Effects

A reduced dose of efavirenz (Sustiva or Stocrin) for first-line HIV therapy suppressed viral load as well as the standard dose, but was associated with fewer characteristic side effects, researchers reported at the recent HIV Drug Therapy 2014 meeting in Glasgow. A related study found that half the dose maintained viral suppression in people with high efavirenz levels in their blood.

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