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Neurocognitive Problems

HIV May Cause Cognitive Impairment by Disrupting Brain's Garbage Disposal

HIV's Tat protein interferes with autophagy, a process by which damaged or unneeded cell components are broken down and eliminated, according to research published in the February 4 Journal of Neuroscience. This disruption can lead to neuron damage, but the immunosuppressant drug rapamycin was able to reverse this process in a study of mice.

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AIDS2014: Efavirenz Use Not Linked to Neurocognitive Impairment, Study Finds

People who use antiretroviral regimens containing efavirenz (Sustiva, also in the Atripla coformulation) were not at higher risk for impaired neurocognitive function, either overall or when looking at specific functional domain, researchers reported this week at the 20th International AIDS Conference in Melbourne, Australia.

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EACS 2013: Suicide Rates and Psychiatric Drug Use Among People with HIV

A study presented at the recent 14th European AIDS Conference found that the suicide rate among people with HIV in British Columbia had fallen 35-fold since 1996 and was now close to that of the general population. However, a second study from Denmark found rates of psychiatric drug use, especially sleeping pills and tranquilizers, to be 2-3 times higher among people with HIV than in the general population, and saw a marked rise in the use of antipsychotic drugs 7 or 8 years after diagnosis.

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CROI 2014: Neurocognitive Problems, Depression, and Early ART in People with HIV

In a particularly challenging area of HIV care where research is complicated by gaps in knowledge and invasive clinical procedures, there was significant attention to neurological manifestations -- or neuroAIDS -- at this year’s Conference on Antiretroviral Agents and Chemotherapy (CROI 2014) last month in Boston.

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ICAAC 2013: Switching from Atripla to Complera Reduces Central Nervous System Side Effects

People who switched single-tablet regimens from Atripla (efavirenz/tenofovir/emtricitabine) to Complera (rilpivirine/tenofovir/emtricitabine) maintained viral load suppression and saw improvement in central nervous system (CNS) side effects such as abnormal dreams and depression, according to a late-breaking poster presented at the 53rd Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC) this month in Denver. Other studies looked at the safety and efficacy of Complera among women and black patients.

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