Back HIV/AIDS Epidemiology

HIV/AIDS Epidemiology & Mortality

CROI 2016: Life Expectancy of HIV-Positive People in U.S. Still Lags 13 Years Behind HIV-Negatives

A study presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2016) comparing life expectancies of HIV-positive and HIV-negative people within the Kaiser Permanente health system has found that although life expectancy among HIV-positive people has improved, expected life at age 20 remains 13 years behind that of matched HIV-negative people. This 13-year gap did not improve between 2008 and 2011, the last year of follow-up in this cohort study.

alt

Read more:

CROI 2016: Major Disparities Persist in Lifetime Risk of HIV Diagnosis in the U.S.

The lifetime risk of being diagnosed with HIV infection in the U.S. has decreased overall during the past decade, falling to 1 in 99, according to a study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2016)this week in Boston. The risk varies widely among population subgroups, however, and half of black gay and bisexual men are likely to become infected if current trends persist.

alt

Read more:

EACS 2015: Majority of Migrants with HIV in Europe May Have Acquired Virus in New Country

A study presented at the 15th European AIDS Conference last month in Barcelona found evidence that the majority of migrants living with HIV in Europe, and who were diagnosed less than 5 years ago, probably acquired the virus in their host country rather than the one in which they were born. The aMASE (Advancing Migrant Access to Health Services in Europe) study found that the proportion of people with a documented or probable date of HIV infection later than their move to, or within, Europe was higher than those with a documented or probable pre-migration infection date, and that this applied to all risk groups, all areas of origin, and both sexes.

alt

Read more:

New HIV Diagnoses Stable In Western Europe, Rising in Central and Eastern Europe

The annual surveillance report recently released by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) shows that the number and rate of new diagnoses of HIV is continuing to rise in Eastern Europe, and is also rising sharply, though from a much lower base, in Central Europe. Meanwhile, the annual number of new diagnoses is stable in Western Europe, but continues to increase among gay men and other men who have sex with men (MSM) in most Central European and Western European countries.

alt

Read more:

IAS 2015: Young Gay Men at Lower Risk for HIV than Previous Generations, but Racial Disparities Persist

An innovative analysis of HIV trends in the Seattle area has found that gay men who were born in the early 1960s had the highest lifetime risk of acquiring HIV, but that this risk has declined dramatically in subsequent generations. But while black gay men born in the 1970s and 1980s have a much lower risk of acquiring HIV than their forebears, racial disparities remain stark, according to a report at the 8thInternational AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention last month in Vancouver.

alt

Read more: