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CROI 2016: Tenofovir HIV Treatment Raises Risk of Broken Bones

Treatment containing tenofovir is associated with a higher risk of bone fractures in people living with HIV, but a single infusion of zoledronic acid -- a drug used in the treatment of osteoporosis -- can protect against bone loss, a pair of studies presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2016) this week in Boston show.

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CROI 2016: Bone Density Recovers Quickly After Stopping Truvada PrEP

Bone mineral density recovers within 6 months after stopping pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) containing tenofovir, Robert Grant from the University of California at San Francisco reported on behalf of the iPrEx study at Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2016) this week in Boston.

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People with HIV Have Higher Bone Fracture Risk in Danish Study

Being HIV positive was associated with a nearly 3-fold greater likelihood of bone fractures overall -- and a 9-fold higher risk of hip and spine fractures -- compared with HIV negative people, according to results from a large Danish population study described in the May 1 Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes.

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IAS 2015: Bone Loss Slows, but Continues Long-term in HIV-positive People on Antiretroviral Therapy

People with HIV experienced a decrease in bone density at the hip and spine during their first 2 years after starting antiretroviral therapy (ART). While bone loss slowed after 96 weeks, it continued to decline more rapidly among HIV-positive people compared with the usual age-related bone loss seen in HIV-negative people over 7 years, researchers reported at the recent 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention in Vancouver.

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CROI 2014: Vitamin D and Rosuvastatin Improve Bone Loss in People with HIV

A combination of high-dose vitamin D and calcium may help reduce bone loss after starting antiretroviral therapy (ART), according to a presentation at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) last month in Boston. A related study found that rosuvastatin increased hip bone mineral density in HIV positive people on ART, though insulin resistance worsened.

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CROI 2015: FRAX Fracture Prediction Tool Underestimates Fracture Risk in Men with HIV

The Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX), an online tool developed by the World Health Organization and used to help guide decisions about who to screen or treat in order to prevent bone fractures, underestimates overall risk of fracture in people living with HIV -- even with an adjustment experts have recommended to improve its accuracy for people with HIV -- according to an analysis of the Veterans Aging Cohort Study Virtual Cohort (VACS-VC) reported at the recent 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle.

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CROI 2014: Researchers Discuss HIV, Aging, and Frailty

People living with HIV are at greater risk of geriatric syndromes such as frailty and difficulty with daily activities than HIV negative people of the same age -- and this can have a significant effect upon their quality of life as they age, according to several studies presented at the 14th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) last month in Boston.

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Screening for Bone Fracture Risk Should Be Routine for HIV+ People over 40

Screening for fracture risk should be a routine part of HIV care for all people over 40, and all postmenopausal women, all men over 50, and people at high risk for fractures of any age should undergo DEXA screening (a type of X-ray) to assess bone mineral density and their need for treatment, experts on bone disorders recommend in new guidelines published in the January 21 online edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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CROI 2014: Newborns Exposed to Tenofovir Have Lower Bone Content [VIDEO]

Infants born to women who took tenofovir during pregnancy had significantly lower bone mineral content than babies who were not exposed, according to study findings reported at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) this month in Boston.

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