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CROI 2015: HCV Sexual Transmission Linked to Anal Sex, Drug Use, Lower CD4 Count

In addition to the usual risk factors for hepatitis C virus (HCV) sexual transmission seen in most previous studies -- such as anal sex and having other sexually transmitted infections -- researchers in the Netherlands also saw an association with nasal and injection drug use and lower CD4 T-cell count, they reported in a poster presentation at the recent 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle.

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Clinicians Report 2 Acute HCV Infections in Kaiser PrEP Program

Two HIV negative men gay receiving HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) through Kaiser Permanente in San Francisco were newly infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), with sex being their only apparent risk factor, Kaiser clinicians reported in the February 18 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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HCV Sexual Transmission: HIV Negative May Be at Risk, More Awareness and Testing Needed

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is known to be sexually transmitted among HIV positive men who have sex with men, but HIV negative men may be at risk as well, according to recent reports. Other recent studies have looked at awareness of HCV sexual transmission and screening practices, suggesting that improvement is needed in both areas.

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Hepatitis C Vaccine Is Safe and Induces Immune Responses in Early Human Trial

A new hepatitis C vaccine demonstrated good safely and tolerability in a first-in-humans Phase 1 clinical trial, with only mild and transient side effects, according to a report in the November 5 edition of Science Translational Medicine. The vaccine, which mimics immune responses in people who naturally clear hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, led to increased production of T-cells targeting the virus. Phase 2 studies are now underway in Baltimore and San Francisco, with results expected in 2016.

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July 28 Is World Hepatitis Day [VIDEO]

July 28 is World Hepatitis Day, an opportunity to raise awareness about viral hepatitis and its consequences. This year's theme -- "Think Again" -- emphasizes that while hepatitis B and C are major causes of death worldwide, viral hepatitis remains remarkably neglected. The World Health Organization (WHO) and others held a press briefing at the 20th International AIDS Conference last week in Melbourne to raise awareness.

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