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XIX International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2012)

July 2012, Washington, DC

AIDS 2012: Triple Infection with HBV Promotes HCV Clearance in People with HIV

altCompetition between hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) in HIV positive people with triple infection appears to promote spontaneous HCV clearance, but lower CD4 T-cell counts and greater liver inflammation reduce the likelihood of clearance, Chinese researchers reported at the XIX International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2012) last month in Washington, DC.

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AIDS 2012: No Interactions Seen Between New TB Drug and Popular HIV Meds

The promising experimental tuberculosis (TB) drug delamanid does not interact with the widely used antiretrovirals tenofovir (Viread) and lopinavir/ritonavir (Kaletra) in ways likely to cause clinical problems, researchers reported at the XIX International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2012) last month in Washington, DC.

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AIDS 2012: Incomplete CD4 T-Cell Response to ART Raises Mortality Risk

Having fewer than 700 CD4 cells/mm3 and hepatitis C coinfection were associated with greater risk of death in a study of U.S. veterans, researchers reported at the recent XIX International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2012) in Washington, DC, suggesting that it may be beneficial to start antiretroviral treatment before CD4 counts fall to this level. alt

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AIDS 2012: Adding Nitazoxanide Does Not Improve Interferon Cure Rate for HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients

Addition of the anti-protozoal drug Nitazoxanide (Alinia) to pegylated interferon plus ribavirin for treatment of chronic hepatitis C did not lead to higher likelihood of sustained virological response (SVR) in a study of people with HIV, but it may confer an advantage for people with unfavorable IL28B gene patterns, according to a study presented last month at the XIX International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2012) in Washington, DC.alt

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AIDS 2012: HIV/HBV Coinfection Linked to Higher Mortality, More ART Liver Toxicity

Approximately 6% of people with HIV receiving antiretroviral treatment in Tanzania were coinfected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), which was associated with an elevated risk of death, smaller CD4 T-cell gains, and greater likelihood of liver toxicity, researchers reported at the recent XIX International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2012) in Washington, DC.

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